Prince William Sound. Alaska

With history behind…

Prince William Sound can be found on the south coast of Alaska, America’s largest state. In 1989 Prince William Sound was decimated by the Exxon Valdez oil spill that killed and endangered many species of animals. Despite the spill leaking an estimated 11 million gallons of oil, Prince William Sound still holds a great deal of beauty and wildlife to be appreciated.

Why Prince William

For a chill out spot, Prince William Sound is not for the faint of heart. Despite being ideal for those seeking the tranquil sights and sounds that only nature can provide, Alaska is known as The Last Frontier for good reason. Certainly do not venture out in the winter. Temperatures throughout Alaska drop below 0oC over the winter and even the animals find it tough going.

A different kind of chill out spot

The summer months are when Prince William Sound is transformed into a truly magical chill out spot. The 3,000 miles of shoreline come alive after the bleak winter with bald eagles, sea lions and elk all common, and abundant, inhabitants of the area. The long days of summer can be spent kayaking the sound from campsite to campsite and enjoying the fine weather.

Sea kayaking is by far the most pleasant and practical way to explore the extensive shoreline. It also provides the perfect perspective from which to view the many glaciers that call Prince William Sound home. However, don’t get to close to these giants of nature as, during the summer, glaciers commonly calve and vast chunks of ice splash into the sound.

Again, Prince William Sound, and Alaska in general, is not for those travelers who are looking for a hammock and white sandy beach. It is a chill out spot for those hearty travelers who enjoy the great outdoors and spending their evenings round a campfire delighting in the stories of majestic bald eagles, giant glaciers and the odd sea lion coming by your kayak to say hello.

If you are looking for Glacier Cruises instead of kayaking, visit this www.princewilliamsound.com website.
Image credit to http://skytrekkingalaska.com

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